When it comes to figuring out the right dose for you, you have to remember that everyone is different and there is no right answer. For different pains and different pain levels, you may need a different dose than others. You have to consider your body weight, health conditions, individual body chemistry, and personal goals. There is no one size fits all approach when it comes to the use of CBD oil. Your individual dosage needs may also change over time as these individual factors change.
One of the most common questions we are asked is… “is cbd oil legal?” This is a tricky question, because Cannabidiol comes in two main forms. Cannabidiol can come from medical marijuana plants or from industrially grown hemp plants. Both are varieties of Cannabis, but they are grown for different purposes, and each one comes with its own legal status.

Cannabidiol, or CBD for short, is a natural phyto-cannabinoid (or plant-based chemical compound) found in cannabis plants, including hemp and marijuana. Unlike other cannabinoids — namely tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC — CBD does not produce any psychoactive effects, and will actually counteract these effects to a degree. CBD will induce feelings of sleepiness; for this reason, it can be an effective soporific for people who struggle to fall and/or remain asleep due to insomnia and other sleep disorders.
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“There is a great deal of confusion regarding the legal status of hemp and why these products are so readily available versus marijuana-based CBD products. In 2014, the Farm Bill stated that hemp was different from marijuana, yet the Drug Enforcement Agency’s (DEA) position is that hemp comes from the cannabis sativa plant and as such falls under the controlled substance act. In 2004, the Hemp Industry Association won a court case against the DEA from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals that ruled the DEA didn’t have the authority to ban hemp under the CSA. “By that federal court ruling, similar to non-scheduled hemp food products, this allows Medical Marijuana, Inc. (including  HempMeds®) to sell online and distribute to customers in the U.S. states,” said Dr. Stuart Titus, the company’s Chief Executive Officer.”
Employee-owned Lazarus Naturals touts its commitment to ethical business practices, including pricing that aims to enable anyone to sample its range. Indeed, for veterans and those with long-term disabilities, there’s even a commendable 40-percent discount on the company’s wares. Customers wanting more bang for their buck could, then, try Lazarus Naturals’ 3,000 mg flavorless CBD tincture, a 60 ml bottle of which costs $125, though an even more potent 6,000 mg tincture is also available. Plus, the supplier’s handy and inexpensive taster packs may be a boon for more indecisive or novice CBD oil users. These packs come in regular and high-potency varieties, both of which contain samples of the company’s tinctures, capsules and CBD-infused coconut oil.
Your product is not generally recognized as safe and effective for the referenced uses and, therefore, the product is a “new drug” under section 201(p) of the Act [21 U.S.C. § 321(p)]. New drugs may not be legally introduced or delivered for introduction into interstate commerce without prior approval from the FDA, as described in section 505(a) of the Act [21 U.S.C. § 355(a)]; see also section 301(d) of the Act [21 U.S.C. § 331(d)]. FDA approves a new drug on the basis of scientific data submitted by a drug sponsor to demonstrate that the drug is safe and effective.
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