Manufacturing CBD oil with zero THC is a complex and costly process. Remember that we answered the question, “Is CBD legal” with the disclaimer that it must contain less than 0.3% THC to comply with federal law. However, many companies take shortcuts and cut corners during the production process to save costs, ending up with CBD that contains significant THC – even if they claim otherwise.
To be clear, there is no one specific test, scan, or anything else of the sort that you can do to determine whether or not you need CBD oil for pain. Also, since cannabis is not yet recognized by the FDA, you unfortunately can’t really go to your doctor either and have them recommend it; until marijuana is FDA-approved, it cannot be prescribed by physicians.
In 2017, state Governor Scott Walker signed and passed the 2017 Wisconsin Act 100. This law is described as a “pilot program to study growth, cultivation, and marketing of industrial hemp.” It allows the cultivation of “only industrial hemp of the species Cannabis sativa, with THC concentration of Non-Detectable.” Republican Representative Jesse Kremer sponsored the bill. He tweeted, “signing the bill will make Wisconsin a national and global leader in hemp production.” Wisconsin is joining over 30 other states across the country that are taking advantage of this new cash crop.

For decades, laws had grouped hemp and marijuana in the same category, conflating both plants and confusing the public. All of this changed in 2018 with the passing of the Agriculture Improvement Act. Also known as the 2018 Farm Bill, the new legislation removed hemp from the federal definition of marijuana and reclassified it as an industrial commodity. In other words, the bill made hemp legal at the federal level and established it is to be regulated by The Department of Agriculture rather than the Drug Enforcement Agency. As a result of the bill, hemp and hemp-derived products are completely legal nationwide, though individual states may still impose minor restrictions.
Finally, CBD is gaining traction as a way to dampen some of the negative effects that come alongside its sister molecule, THC. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the psychoactive compound in recreational and medical cannabis, and while it’s being actively explored for medical applications in its own right, it does have some well-known side effects, such as paranoia and anxiety.

Generalized pain, for instance, has dozens upon dozens of high profile research and clinical studies that have been carried out in universities and laboratories around the globe. One of the most well-publicized of these studies took place back in 2008, in which results determined that “cannabinoid analgesics (pain relievers) have generally been well tolerated in clinical trials … with acceptable adverse event profiles (meaning acceptable effectiveness for practical use).
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