CW Hemp’s Charlotte’s Web strain of hemp came to national attention in 2013 after it was featured on a CNN segment telling the story of Charlotte Figi. Figi has Dravet syndrome, a form of epilepsy; CNN has reported, however, that after the girl began to take CW Hemp’s CBD oil, her seizures radically reduced in number. A touching update to Figi’s tale can be found on CW Hemp’s website, where those looking to see how the company’s CBD oil products might benefit them are able to purchase capsules, cream and balm. Frequent customers, meanwhile, can take advantage of the brand’s hemp oil bulk package, which offers five regular-sized bottles of CW Hemp’s bespoke blends for the price of four – making it a more cost-effective way for some to get their daily dose of CBD.
Green Gorilla marks itself out by simply blending its flagship line of CBD oils with organically produced extra virgin olive oil – and nothing else. And, as the company states, there’s a benefit to this beyond assuring the product’s purity. In particular, olive oil “has synergistic effects in combination with CBD,” and according to Green Gorilla’s website, it’s “also able to deliver the CBD to the parts of [the] body that need it most.” The products are certainly affordable, too: its 150 mg pure CBD oil comes in at $25.99, for instance, making it a smart choice for new users. And anyone still uncertain about the potential effects of Green Gorilla’s products may have their questions answered by the convenient “science” section of the manufacturer’s website, which neatly explains the difference between THC – the cannabinoid that makes people “high” – and CBD.
When it comes to buying CBD oil, you must be exceedingly cautious because there is a tremendous amount of misinformation and outright deceit within the industry. Many online resources may try to mislead you for profit or other disingenuous reasons. For instance, some Cannabidiol oil companies advertise that their products contain a specific concentration of CBD (displayed in either percentages or milligrams (mg). However, independent research has shown that many of these sellers and their products do not live up to their claims as their products contain far less CBD than they state in print. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued warning letters to specific companies in 2016 because their products were found to contain far less CBD than advertised.
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