As more and more states legalize the use of marijuana, a product known as CBD oil has surged in popularity. A chemical compound found in the cannabis plant, CBD, or cannabidiol, is non-intoxicating and does not cause the noticeable euphoric effects associated with tetrahydrocannabinol (or THC, another marijuana compound). Products marketed as CBD oil may contain THC.

It’s fair to say that the CBD market is thriving. According to market intelligence company Hemp Business Journal, $130 million worth of products containing the cannabinoid were bought in the U.S. in 2016. And that figure is only set to rise in the years to come, the data analyst believes. Indeed, the source estimates that consumer sales of CBD goods will total an astounding $2.1 billion by 2020 – buoyed, perhaps, by claims that the usage of such products can help alleviate the symptoms of chronic pain, depression and diabetes, to name but a few conditions.
The researchers were able to show that the patients who received the CBD oil were less interested and less excited about the cigarette cues created by the researchers, which suggests that CBD itself could help reduce impulses to continue using. CBD has also been explored as a potential treatment for opiate abuse, though given the fraught legal and ethical landscape surrounding opiate addiction, solid studies on CBD for painkiller abuse are few and far between.
When it comes to buying CBD oil, you must be exceedingly cautious because there is a tremendous amount of misinformation and outright deceit within the industry. Many online resources may try to mislead you for profit or other disingenuous reasons. For instance, some Cannabidiol oil companies advertise that their products contain a specific concentration of CBD (displayed in either percentages or milligrams (mg). However, independent research has shown that many of these sellers and their products do not live up to their claims as their products contain far less CBD than they state in print. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued warning letters to specific companies in 2016 because their products were found to contain far less CBD than advertised.
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