The CBD oil in everything that’s sold by Receptra Naturals is extracted from hemp from family-owned farms in Colorado. And the oil produced by the hemp plants – which are cultivated completely organically – is only taken from the flowering parts to ensure its purity and quality. Those of an environmentally conscious bent may therefore particularly appreciate the company’s offerings, which include CBD oil blends that aim either to boost users’ overall sense of health or, for people who are particularly physically active, to just give them a bit more pep in their steps. The most potent of these oils is, for the record, a 4,000 mg concentrate. But Receptra Naturals’ range also includes a topical cream, a skin-conditioning body butter and a CBD extract blend for pets that, the producer states, may help with anxiety, mobility and digestion in animals.

Cannabidiol is a chemical in the Cannabis sativa plant, also known as marijuana or hemp. Over 80 chemicals, known as cannabinoids, have been identified in the Cannabis sativa plant. While delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the major active ingredient in marijuana, cannabidiol is also obtained from hemp, which contains only very small amounts of THC.


Multiple sclerosis (MS). A prescription-only nasal spray product (Sativex, GW Pharmaceuticals) containing both 9-delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol has been shown to be effective for improving pain, muscle-tightness, and urination frequency in people with MS. This product is used in over 25 countries outside of the United States. But there is inconsistent evidence on the effectiveness of cannabidiol for symptoms of multiple sclerosis when it is used alone. Some early research suggests that using a cannabidiol spray under the tongue might improve pain and muscle tightness, but not muscle spasms, tiredness, bladder control, mobility, or well-being and quality of life in patients with MS. 

When it comes to buying CBD oil, you must be exceedingly cautious because there is a tremendous amount of misinformation and outright deceit within the industry. Many online resources may try to mislead you for profit or other disingenuous reasons. For instance, some Cannabidiol oil companies advertise that their products contain a specific concentration of CBD (displayed in either percentages or milligrams (mg). However, independent research has shown that many of these sellers and their products do not live up to their claims as their products contain far less CBD than they state in print. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued warning letters to specific companies in 2016 because their products were found to contain far less CBD than advertised.
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