As noted in the previous section, CBD oil prices vary significantly by brand. The best practice for most is to determine a per-milligram budget for CBD oil, as well as a maximum price for the entire bottle. For example, you might decide that 10 cents per milligram or less is a reasonable budget; and that $45 (for a 450-mg concentration, based on the budget) is a maximum bottle price. Also, if ordering online, be sure to include potential shipping costs.

In the United States, CBD itself is not specifically listed in the United States Controlled Substances Act like the psychoactive compound, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The US government, which specifies which parts of cannabis plants are prohibited, excludes hemp’s “mature stalks” and “oil or cake made from the seeds” and “sterilized seeds” from its definition of “marihuana.”

At the top of our ranking is Portland-based Lazarus Naturals, which has honed a reputation for high-quality, affordable CBD. Their consciously crafted CBD is sourced from organic, Oregon-grown hemp which the company controls from seed to sale. With low prices, a robust assistance program, free shipping, and a 30-day, no questions asked return policy, you really can’t go wrong with Lazarus Naturals.
Customer Service: It’s difficult to find contact information on Calm by Wellness’s website, and their email address is listed incorrectly in two places (we tried sending them an email but it was not delivered). We were, however, able to get a response through Facebook, and the company does offer free shipping and a generous 30-day return policy on all orders.
The unflavored oil is derived from organic hemp seed oil. It is considered both vegan and gluten-free, and does not have any artificial sweeteners or preservatives. The oil contains 0.3% THC, meaning those who face the possibility of drug tests may want to avoid taking it, but this relatively small amount produces little, if any, psychoactive effect. The price per mg is $0.11, making the Spruce Lab Grade CBD Oil less expensive than average.

Generalized pain, for instance, has dozens upon dozens of high profile research and clinical studies that have been carried out in universities and laboratories around the globe. One of the most well-publicized of these studies took place back in 2008, in which results determined that “cannabinoid analgesics (pain relievers) have generally been well tolerated in clinical trials … with acceptable adverse event profiles (meaning acceptable effectiveness for practical use).

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