Internationally, the CBD industry is currently under-regulated. Regulation refers to the checks and balances governments employ to control business behaviour and ensure safe, consistent products. The current level of limited regulation within the CBD industry has allowed a host of low-quality products to enter the market. For instance, a 2017 study by the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine revealed an alarming inconsistency of CBD product quality within the US:
For decades, laws had grouped hemp and marijuana in the same category, conflating both plants and confusing the public. All of this changed in 2018 with the passing of the Agriculture Improvement Act. Also known as the 2018 Farm Bill, the new legislation removed hemp from the federal definition of marijuana and reclassified it as an industrial commodity. In other words, the bill made hemp legal at the federal level and established it is to be regulated by The Department of Agriculture rather than the Drug Enforcement Agency. As a result of the bill, hemp and hemp-derived products are completely legal nationwide, though individual states may still impose minor restrictions.
CBD hemp oil is the product derived from the hemp plant, which is high in CBD (cannabidiol) and low in THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). This oil has received a large amount of attention in recent years, due to the growing wave of marijuana legislation and debate in many countries, including the United States. While cannabis and smoking marijuana (which often has a high level of the psychotropic compound THC) is still illegal in many places, as more is being learned about CBD, and its potential effects on health, it is becoming more and more accepted as a legal and safe remedy for a wide variety of health conditions. Since it has a minimal amount of the psychotropic compound THC, use of this oil does not result in a traditional “high”, so its effects are generally considered therapeutic, not mind-altering.
House Bill 2107 was brought during the 2017 legislative session with a number of vocal supporters. The bill sought to remove the “low THC” restriction and amend the law to allow for “medicinal marijuana.” It also sought to expand the types of conditions that can be treated with cannabis by including post-traumatic stress disorder and terminal cancer. Finally, the bill sought to modify the language, from requiring a doctor’s prescription to requiring a doctor’s recommendation. This change intended to address concerns about the legality of physicians prescribing something prohibited by federal law. Despite having 77 sponsors and co-sponsors, 29 of whom were Republican, the bill died in committee. Given strong support, as well as national trends, changes in Texas law are likely to occur in the future.
For epilepsy: A prescription cannabidiol product (Epidiolex) has been used. The recommended starting dose is usually 2.5 mg/kg twice daily (5 mg/kg/day). After one week the dose can be increased to 5 mg/kg twice daily (10 mg/kg/day). If the person doesn't respond to this dose, the maximum recommended is 10 mg/kg twice daily (20 mg/kg/day). In some research, higher doses of up to 50 mg/kg daily have been used. There is no strong scientific evidence that nonprescription cannabidiol products are beneficial for epilepsy.
Vaporizers – Many state-licensed cannabis dispensaries offer high CBD strains of cannabis flower. This allows for reduced risk of paranoia while allowing for a high medicinal dose of CBD. Vaporizers are used to heat up the flower and remove the properties or compounds of the plant that you are looking for without combustion or smoking. Vaporizers use convection much like a convection oven.
And now, onto the thorny issue of legality. The simple answer to the question is yes — if it is extracted from hemp. The 2014 Farm Bill established guidelines for growing hemp in the U.S. legally. This so-called “industrial hemp” refers to both hemp and hemp products which come from cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC and are grown by a state-licensed farmer.
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