Multiple sclerosis (MS). A prescription-only nasal spray product (Sativex, GW Pharmaceuticals) containing both 9-delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol has been shown to be effective for improving pain, muscle-tightness, and urination frequency in people with MS. This product is used in over 25 countries outside of the United States. But there is inconsistent evidence on the effectiveness of cannabidiol for symptoms of multiple sclerosis when it is used alone. Some early research suggests that using a cannabidiol spray under the tongue might improve pain and muscle tightness, but not muscle spasms, tiredness, bladder control, mobility, or well-being and quality of life in patients with MS.

Is CBD Legal? Marijuana-derived CBD products are illegal on the federal level, but are legal under some state laws. Hemp-derived CBD products (with less than 0.3 percent THC) are legal on the federal level, but are still illegal under some state laws. Check your state's laws and those of anywhere you travel. Keep in mind that nonprescription CBD products are not FDA-approved, and may be inaccurately labeled.


I started taking CDB oil under the tongue a few months ago for pain. Seems to help BUT I have a terrible lingering after taste and a sense of smell as well. I quit taking it for or over a week and I still have the same smell and Ted taste effecffects. Now I can’t even smell my own perfume or coffee or bacon frying. It all smells and tastes just like the CDB oil. AND My coffee, ice cream, bacon etc etc all smell like the taste of CDB.
Whether you will be prosecuted for possession of CBD oil in Texas depends entirely upon where you are located.  In North Texas, Denton County is not prosecuting CBD oil only cases, Dallas County is "not aggressively prosecuting" CBD oil cases, and the Collin County District Attorney is still deciding. Tarrant County, on the other hand, is prosecuting CBD Oil cases.

Your product is not generally recognized as safe and effective for the referenced uses and, therefore, the product is a “new drug” under section 201(p) of the Act [21 U.S.C. § 321(p)]. New drugs may not be legally introduced or delivered for introduction into interstate commerce without prior approval from the FDA, as described in section 505(a) of the Act [21 U.S.C. § 355(a)]; see also section 301(d) of the Act [21 U.S.C. § 331(d)]. FDA approves a new drug on the basis of scientific data submitted by a drug sponsor to demonstrate that the drug is safe and effective.


Multiple sclerosis (MS). There is inconsistent evidence on the effectiveness of cannabidiol for symptoms of multiple sclerosis. Some early research suggests that using a cannabidiol spray under the tongue might improve pain and muscle tightness in people with MS. However, it does not appear to improve muscle spasms, tiredness, bladder control, the ability to move around, or well-being and quality of life.
Vaping is one of the most bioavailable methods in delivering CBD throughout the body. During inhalation, CBD enters through the lungs and diffuses directly into the circulatory system. In contrast to the 30-60 minutes it generally takes for an edible to kick in, the timely efficiency of vaping is vastly superior. And while we’re comparing CBD edibles to CBD vapes, consider this: the same beneficial effects can be achieved with a much smaller amount of CBD by vaping. The CBD transfer from lungs to bloodstream is far more efficient than sending CBD through the liver where its absorbed and broken down by enzymes – a process that can remove the potency of cannabidiol.

And now, onto the thorny issue of legality. The simple answer to the question is yes — if it is extracted from hemp. The 2014 Farm Bill established guidelines for growing hemp in the U.S. legally. This so-called “industrial hemp” refers to both hemp and hemp products which come from cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC and are grown by a state-licensed farmer.
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