First… hemp, cannabis, marijuana (slang term)… they’re from the exact same plant species – Cannabis sativa. It’s common to mistake hemp and cannabis unless you know why they’re different. The easiest way to tell? If it’s under .3% THC content then it’s hemp and is classified as legal for academic and educational purposes, according to federal law. What is commonly referred to as cannabis (or medical marijuana) contains THC levels above .3% and can extend into levels between 15-30% THC. Remember, THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the psychoactive component of cannabis. Without these higher THC levels, there are no psychoactive effects for you.

Third-Party Testing: Once a CBD oil is manufactured, CBD oil companies will often submit their products for third-party tests, which are conducted by non-company personnel to ensure the product is safe for public consumption and meets quality standards.CBD oils should always be accompanied with information about third-party tests; best practice is to avoid oils that do not supply these details.


While in all of these states recreational marijuana remains illegal, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Ohio and Rhode Island have all decriminalized the drug. In these states, having smaller amounts of marijuana on you won't lead to an arrest or a criminal record. The maximum amount you're allowed to have on your person will vary by state.
The key is to effectively gauge exactly how much CBD oil it takes to start managing your pain. If you start off right away with a maximum dose of a 600 mg tincture, you will have no idea how much of the product it actually took to treat your condition, and how much you wasted (this is also important because you do not want to exceed dosage and end up developing a tolerance to the active cannabinoids).
And now, onto the thorny issue of legality. The simple answer to the question is yes — if it is extracted from hemp. The 2014 Farm Bill established guidelines for growing hemp in the U.S. legally. This so-called “industrial hemp” refers to both hemp and hemp products which come from cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC and are grown by a state-licensed farmer. 
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